Title: mtsinai

Parent Collection:

Description:

Mount Sinai School of Medicine and the World Trade Center Worker and Volunteer Medical Screening Program

This collection includes web pages and flyers made available on-line and as printed flyers by several departments of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City soon after the World Trade Center (WTC) attacks.

The Community and Preventative Medicine Program (CPM) was one of the first medical programs to respond to the WTC disaster. The CPM compiled information to help educate volunteers, rescue workers and others about ways to avoid possibly hazardous exposures to materials released by the destruction of the Twin Towers. Students also rushed to help victims of the WTC collapse; one page here documents their efforts. Meanwhile the Psychiatry Department's Traumatic Stress Studies Program offered treatment to WTC survivors as well as information for mental health professionals on their web pages.This collection also includes materials from the comprehensive Worker and Volunteer Medical Screening Program, launched in July, 2002 with the hospital's Center for Occupational and Environmental Medicine to track and treat the long-term health effects which may arise from these exposures.

About the World Trade Center Worker and Volunteer Medical Screening Program

The World Trade Center Worker and Volunteer Medical Screening Program is a comprehensive medical evaluation program to provide free and confidential medical exams, referrals for medical care, and occupational health education for the 8,500 workers and volunteers who provided rescue, recovery, debris removal and sifting, and restoration of vital support services at the World Trade Center and Staten Island landfill sites. The program is directed by the Mount Sinai Center for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, in partnership with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, with medical examinations and related services provided by a consortium of occupational medicine providers. Goals of the program include: identifying individuals who sustained hazardous exposures during their work at the WTC and landfill sites, providing medical screening and referrals for medical care for those with persistent problems, educating workers and volunteers about the possible risks to their health from their exposures and about services and benefits available to them, and long-term monitoring to identify WTC-related conditions which may develop later.

For more information visit the Screening Program's Web site, www.wtcexams.org